A Lunchtime CLE Session Based on “The Structure of M&A Contracts”

You might have seen my post earlier today about my book The Structure of M&A Contracts.

In writing it, I was reminded that a few years ago I did a public seminar based on the book. And I did a seminar at a law firm. Heck, I even did a webcast. But I quickly dropped the seminars.

What’s great about my “Drafting Clearer Contracts” seminars is that they’re … fun! They cover a lot of interesting topics, so no one has a chance to get bored. We get to discuss some ridiculous features of traditional contract drafting. And I get to lay some nifty and unexpected recommendations on people.

By contrast, my seminars based on The Structure of M&A Contracts were … hard work. Instead of skipping blithely from one topic to the next, it was like studying circuit diagrams, noting how saying something over here has implications over there. There’s no future in doing seminars that aren’t fun.

But this is a fascinating topic, one that’s mishandled in most M&A contracts and inadequately treated in the literature. So I think it deserves more airtime.

Here’s what I propose: You buy copies of the book for your lawyers. (I’m sure Thomson Reuters would be delighted to offer you a volume discount.) They read it—hey, it’s only a hundred pages. I show up for an hour-long lunchtime CLE session at your law firm or company. I do a twenty-minute overview of the book. Then we spend the rest of the time in a Q&A. We wouldn’t have any problem filling the time.

So have your people call my people.

Categories M&A

About the author

Ken Adams is the leading authority on how to say clearly whatever you want to say in a contract. He’s author of A Manual of Style for Contract Drafting, and he offers online and in-person training around the world. He’s also chief content officer of LegalSifter, Inc., a company that combines artificial intelligence and expertise to assist with review of contracts.