Which Category of Contract Language Works for This Sentence?

Consider the following:

The User may monitor its Service account via the “Acme Portal,” which is available at www.acme.com/accounts.

It’s phrased as language of discretion, but I don’t think that makes sense. Acme isn’t saying, “We’re allowing you to access your account in this manner.” Instead, the idea is that anyone who has an account can access it in that manner.

So how would you express that?

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Updated 27 December 2015:

OK, enough pussyfooting around. Here’s an alternative formulation:

The User can monitor its Service account via the “Acme Portal,” which is available at www.acme.com/accounts.

If that functionality (I know, that’s not a great word) is a basic feature of the service in question, it might be ponderous to phrase it as language of obligation, as Mark suggests in his comment.

But I offer this with extreme trepidation, as currently no such category exists in the categories-of-contract-language universe.

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Updated 28 December 2015:

Isn’t this a statement of fact by the vendor? Here’s how that would read:

The Vendor states that the User can monitor its Service account via the “Acme Portal,” which is available at www.acme.com/accounts.

About the author

Ken Adams is the leading authority on how to say clearly whatever you want to say in a contract. He’s author of A Manual of Style for Contract Drafting, and he offers online and in-person training around the world. He’s also chief content officer of LegalSifter, Inc., a company that combines artificial intelligence and expertise to assist with review of contracts.