Read Any Good Law Reviews Lately?

As noted in this ABA Journal item, Chief Justice Roberts doesn’t find law reviews very useful. Neither do I.

For purposes of this post, I’m taking “law review” to mean a scholarly journal that focuses on legal issues and is published by faculty or students at a law school or by a bar association.

Every so often I glance at ContractsProf Blog’s regular “New in Print” posts (e.g., here) and “Weekly Top Tens from the Social Science Research Network” posts (e.g., here). So far, I haven’t been tempted to read any of the law review articles listed, because I haven’t seen anything that seems as if it treats, in a compelling way, what you should say in a contract, or how you should say whatever you want to say.

But I have been known to read law review articles. A few times I’ve searched on Westlaw or Lexis for guidance on a given issue and have found a useful discussion a law review article. And I’m a fanboy of Glenn West’s articles in The Business Lawyer (go to this post for links). (The Business Lawyer is published by the Section of Business Law of the ABA, which suggests that bar associations may be a more likely source for that most vulgar of offerings, a practical law review article.)

But I have only the flimsiest awareness of what’s on offer in law reviews. Can you suggest any law review articles that readers of this blog might find of interest?

About the author

Ken Adams is the leading authority on how to say clearly whatever you want to say in a contract. He’s author of A Manual of Style for Contract Drafting, and he offers online and in-person training around the world. He’s also chief content officer of LegalSifter, Inc., a company that combines artificial intelligence and expertise to assist with review of contracts.